2017 Iaido Summer Camp

It was a busy day of testing at the AUSKF Iaido and Jodo summer camp.
Iaido ranks received: Michael Jacobson 2kyu iaido, Michael Schuldt 1dan iaido.

Michael Jacobson 1kyu jodo, Adam Sandor 1kyu jodo, Michael Schuldt 1kyu jodo, Bradley Anderson 1kyu jodo.
This was the first AUSKF sponsored jodo rank testing to be offered at a camp, and ALL members who tested for 1kyu and 1dan this time PASSED.
Tomorrow rounds out the event with more jodo seminar, and then back to regular classes at home in Fargo.
Congratulations to all who passed, and a special thank you to everyone who attended and participated.

Nancy James wrote a very nice Facebook article and provided some excellent pictures of the event.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnancy.james.92%2Fposts%2F10212666582967125&width=500

We just finished another awesome AUSKF Iaido summer camp. This year it was held in Bryn Mawr college near Philadelphia, PA. What a beautiful campus!
Attending sensei from Japan this year were Sakono sensei and Oda sensei, both 8dan in iaido.
Excellent teachings and seminar!
Two students from the Agassiz dojo placed in the tournament today. Adam Sandor won 3rd place in the unranked division, and Michael Schuldt got 2nd place in the 1kyu-1Dan division. Congratulations fellows,and nice job!
Tomorrow rounds out with the rank testing for both iaido and jodo, and then will be followed by the jodo seminar.
It’s been a great week so far!

Book Learning for Iaido?

I’ve seen several FB videos and posts of people doing iaido the last few weeks to varying degrees of maturity and accuracy. One fellow admits he’s only learned from videos, and has mixed things up a bit without having a sensei or a consistent style to base it upon, though he’s calling it “seitei.”

Another, a self-proclaimed Master steps through some kata to which he’s changed some of the basic techniques, and moves through them with no consciousness of the opponent(s) of whom he’s supposed to be reacting to, no timing or grace. There’s no depth of practice, though he boasts years of experience and some level of mastery.

Maybe I’m too critical, after all my own iaido could easily be criticized on various levels and faults found. I know I have a long list of things to work on and improve.

Kihon, breathing, posture, timing, “presence” all come from experience and time practicing with someone to correct you – putting in the time with a heart set to listen, apply, and learn.

I think that learning from books and videos as a supplement to receiving instruction from a sensei is absolutely possible and encouraged – as long as the materials are accurate and detailed. But without that initial “introduction” to something, say jo, it would be very hard to capture the essence of jo. Without getting swung at in tachi-uchi by the Uchidachi, it would be very hard to capture the reaction and timing in a video. Without having a sensei to say, “Show me,” and then getting points for improvement, is improvement to a higher level even possible?

I don’t know what inspired me to write this, or where it’s even going, except maybe to say, “Find a sensei, or at least go to a seminar or something on occasion to get the “real” thing. If you can, stick with them and attend regularly. Then study the writings and the videos to “tune a bit,” but make sure they’re the right videos and not just guys doing iaido. Stick with one style. Then get back with a sensei again. And most of all, have a heart that is humble and open to being corrected. Practice without distraction and with an attitude of not just “doing” the moves, but with thinking why and how you’re doing the moves. Execute, analyze, repeat. Get some feedback. Take to heart that feedback. Then execute, analyze, repeat again.

Then, maybe someday you’ll be able to execute one of the kata you’re practicing to your satisfaction.

March Newsletter

Spring is in the air!

It looks like spring is just around the corner, and we can finally say goodbye to old man winter. I know he’s hung around a bit too long and worn out his welcome.

Testing – Congratulations!

Congratulations goes to Shawn J, who received his 3kyu, Andrew M. – 4kyu, Mike S. – 4kyu, and Andy R. – 4kyu. Way go to fellas!

Up until now, the first “rank” in our dojo has been 4kyu. I’ve added an additional rank of 5kyu which we’ll be implementing going forward. The thought behind this new, and additional rank is to give members a taste of our koryu, Musoshindenryu, before they get into the more restricted seitei iaido.

I believe that by introducing the first four kata of the Shoden series, students will have a better base of the kihon (fundamentals). Shohatto, Sato, Uto, and Atarito are all performed from seiza, much like the first three kata in seitei. The nice thing about these first koryu kata is that they are all essentially the same kata, just performed from four different starting directions. I think this will help reinforce the critical movements we need to master in iaido, and give the beginning student slightly less rigid requirements as found in seitei.

We’ll see how it goes after a class or two have started this way, but I think it will be a positive change, and I’m looking forward to getting back to koryu on a more regular basis.

CoreCon 2014

I’m hoping to have our dojo participate again in the CoreCon this spring. The Con has changed from May to Mid-June, this year, so hopefully we can put on our regular demonstration and discussion. We’ve had pretty good attendance at our panel since we started doing this in 2008. Look for more news on that to come!

AUSKF Summer Camp

The AUSKF summer camp will be held in New York this year, June 12-15. I’m hoping that some members from our dojo will be able to attend this wonderful educational and testing opportunity.

The AUSKF has stated that they will try to hold each year’s camp in one of three “regional” parts of the country. Last year it was in the “central” region, this year East, and next year it will be out West somewhere. It makes travel a little expensive, but hopefully a person will be able to attend at least one in three camps near their regional federation.

Other Stuff

Just a reminder for all current students that we are able to wear our black hakama on the first practice of the month.

Reishiki (Etiquette)

This is a good topic to review sometimes, especially for any new members.

When we start and end our practice, the reishiki or etiquette is an important aspect.

Opening

  1. (Standing) All turn to shommen. Sensei / lead student calls out, “Shommen ni rei.” All bow to shommen.
  2. “Suwatte” (sit down). Everyone sits in seiza and places their katana to the right of where they’re sitting, tsuka forward w/ tsuba at their knee.
  3. Lead student calls, “Mokuso!” Everyone meditates until the lead student again calls, “Yame!” (Stop/Quit)
  4. Lead student calls, “Sensei ni rei!” All members bow to the sensei and say, “Onegaishimasu!” (Pronounced oh-nay-gai-shimasu).
  5. Everyone takes and places their katana at a slightly L-R rising angle, centered in front of them with room enough to place their hands when they bow.
  6. Lead student calls, “To-rei!” Everyone performs the bow to the sword, starting left hand down, right hand down , right back up, left back up.
  7. Everyone puts the katana into their obi and ties their sageo (without looking), and then waits patiently in seiza.
  8. Sensei calls, “Tatte kudasai” (Please rise / stand up) and everyone rises and awaits further instruction.

Closing – the closing is pretty much the same as the opening, just in reverse, and with different responses from the students to the sensei.

  1. “Suwatte” (sit down). Everyone sits in seiza, unhooks their sageo (without looking) and places their katana horizontally, tsuka to the left.
  2. Lead student calls, “To-rei!” Everyone performs the bow to the sword, starting left hand down, right hand down , right back up, left back up.
  3. Everyone gathers the sageo, and places the katana to the right of where they’re sitting, tsuka forward w/ tsuba at their knee.
  4. Lead student calls, “Sensei ni rei!” All members bow to the sensei and say, “Domo arigato gozaimashita!” (Thank you very much)
  5. Lead student calls, “Mokuso!” Everyone meditates until the lead student again calls, “Yame!” (Stop/Quit)
  6. Everyone takes their katana, gathers the sageo if necessary, and places it on their left thigh with the tsuka-gashira on centerline and waits patiently for instruction from the sensei.
  7. Sensei calls, “Tatte kudasai” (Please rise / stand up) and everyone rises, turns and faces shommen.
  8. Sensei / Lead student calls, “Shommen ni rei!” and all members bow to shommen.
  9. Everyone finishes the bow, and then steps back three steps starting with their left foot, turns right, and exits the practice floor and goes over to wait by the sensei for closing remarks and announcements.

Reishiki is at the very core of the Japanese sword arts of kendo and iaido. According to the Zen Nihon Kendo Renmei (All Japan Kendo Federation) who is our ultimate authority on kendo / iaido, the concept of kendo is defined as follows:

“The concept of Kendo is to discipline the human character through the application of the principles of the Katana (sword).”

Further, the purpose of kendo:

“The purpose of practicing Kendo is:
To mold the mind and body,
To cultivate a vigorous spirit,
And through correct and rigid training,
To strive for improvement in the art of Kendo,
To hold in esteem human courtesy and honor,
To associate with others with sincerity,
And to forever pursue the cultivation of oneself.
This will make one be able:
To love his/her country and society,
To contribute to the development of culture
And to promote peace and prosperity among all peoples.”

(The Concept of Kendo was established by All Japan Kendo Federation in 1975.)

Even though these specifically refer to kendo, I think that we could simply substitute the word “iaido” for “kendo” and they would be equally applicable.

While these concepts may not be apparent to newer students, over time, and with a good instructor, they will become a core part of the dojo and hopefully it’s members.

Happy spring!

Brad

December Newsletter

Happy Holidays!

Christmas is just around the corner, and it’s been a good year for our dojo!

Some highlights from 2013

  • Membership increase from open enrollment. We’re now up to eight regularly practicing students – the highest we’ve had since the dojo was founded in 2007. I anticipate another one or two more will rejoin or join in the next open enrollment in 2014 as well.
  • Advancement. We’ve now got a Shodan (1st dan – black belt equivalent), three 2kyu, and one 4kyu student. I anticipate everyone will be ranked or jump a rank within the next 4 months or so. We’ve got some people who began in July who are almost ready to attempt their first test – 4kyu.
  • CoreCon demo. Several members participated in the CoreCon event in Moorhead last May. We performed seitei, Musoshindenryu, and Tachi-Uchi-no-Kurai kata. It was our 5th appearance there, and we’re already looking forward to next year’s event!
  • Pangea Culture Festival booth and demo. This was our 4th year there, and there was a huge number of people who watched the demo given by Erik, Andrew, Tyler, and Andy. See the following article for more information on that.
  • Volunteering at the Emergency Food Pantry. Several members of the dojo took one of our practice sessions and volunteered at the Emergency Food Pantry here in Fargo. They serve families in the community by providing a week’s worth of food for families in emergency situations. We volunteered there to sort through several pallets of food that they had received from the recent “Fill the dome” event. I appreciate everyone who could make it and the positive spirit of donating time for this very worthwhile service.
  • Crystal Lake, IL seminar. I traveled to Crystal Lake, IL to give a two day seitei iaido seminar for several people at the Abiding Spirit Aikido Center. The Abiding Spirit Center is one of the few places in the Northwest suburbs offering training in Iaido. It was a great seminar and I really enjoyed going there and meeting some new folks. I hope to return in 2014 if possible.

Looking forward to 2014
We’ve got a few big things coming up this year, and I’m very excited!

  • AUSKF Educational tour – Iaido seminar. We will be hosting our third annual iaido seminar here in Fargo, ND on Feb 4-5. This year will be extra special, as we are also an official stop on the AUSKF Iaido Educational Tour. We will be hosting Chihiro Kishimoto sensei, Kazuma Okuda sensei, and Shozo Kato sensei. Simply stated, it’s going to be awesome! Details and registration for the seminar can be found at http://seminar.musoshindenryu.com.
  • Open enrollment – sometime in Feb after the seminar.
  • Iaido seminar – Visit to Des Moines to present a small seitei iaido seminar for Ric Flinn’s members at the Des Moines Iaido dojo.
  • CoreCon Demo – May 2014
  • AUSKF Iaido Summer Camp – June 2014
  • Pangea Culture Festival – Nov 2014

I’m hoping to see our dojo continue to mature and some of the senior ‘kyu’ ranks test up and continue to advance in seitei. I’m also starting to introduce more people (as they’re able) to the koryu Musoshindenryu. We’re going to continue working through those kata, and also continue polishing our paired Tachi Uchi no Kurai kata.

It’s going to be a great year!

The following article was submitted by senpai Erik Ness. Erik currently holds the rank of 2kyu, and led the demo at the Pangea Culture festival held here in Moorhead last month.

2013 Pangea Moorhead, MN

The 2013 Pangea Culture Festival was held November 9, 2013, at the Hjemkomst Center in Moorhead, MN. The Pangea is a celebration of the community’s traditions and cultures in a multi-ethnic showcase of music, dance, culinary arts, and children’s activities. This event was free and open to the public.

The Musoshindenryu Agassiz Dojo presented the art of Japanese Swordsmanship. This demonstration was well-received as evidenced by the number of people in the audience.
The demonstration started out with kata from the koryu style of Musoshindenryu. The members then introduced the audience to some of the etiquette (reishiki) and seitei kata. A brief history of Musoshindenryu was next followed by tachi-uchi no kurai, a paired kata in which the practitioners use bokken, or wooden swords. The demonstration ended with more seitei and koryu kata.

Seitei iaido is “standard” iaido which is taught and studied by members of the All Japan Kendo Federation. There are 12 kata that originate from three major styles of iaido. Seitei allows practitioners from different styles and countries to practice the same kata consistently.

Following the demonstration, the audience was invited to view the member’s iaito (dull swords), bokken, and hakama (traditional uniform). The younger members of the audience had an opportunity to hold the iaito and have their pictures taken with the demonstrators.

In addition to demonstrating kata, the Musoshindenryu Agassiz Dojo had a booth in which people had an opportunity to view videos of high level practitioners showcasing their kata and hold iaito and bokken with assistance. Another interesting aspect of the Pangea was that the children were given a ‘passport’ and at each booth they visited, the children got a sticker to put in the passport. The sticker that the Musoshindenryu Agassiz Dojo passed out was Japan.
Member participating in the demonstration included: Erik Ness, Tyler Wilson, Andrew Mueller and Andy Ryan.

The Musoshindenryu Agassiz Dojo was honored to present during the Pangea festival and are hopeful for a return in 2014.

  
   

Congratulations

Congratulations goes to Tyler Wilson on achieving his 2kyu ranking.
Congratulations goes to Shawn Johnston on achieving his 4kyu ranking.

Our dojo rank system starts with 4kyu. Students who have completed at least 6 months of practice and can show a competent level of understanding of basic reishiki (etiquette), and the first five kata in the seitei series can test for 4kyu. After that the ranks progress as 3kyu, and 2kyu. After achieving 2kyu, students must then attend a regional/national AUSKF event and test in front of a board of judges. First kyu (1kyu) is the last of the kyu ranks, and then it starts with Shodan (1dan) and on up. Currently the highest “dan” ranking that can be tested for in the IKF is 8th Dan. The two sensei that are coming for our seminar in February both hold this highest ranking.

Food pantry photos

So, we’ve got a lot coming up.

I’d especially like to thank the senpai Kelly and Erik for helping out over the last few months especially. It’s great to see them and everyone else grow in the art, and personally.

Merry Christmas!
Brad

New Year Iaito Sale!

New Year Sale!

All Merchandise on Sale!

Get a new Nosyudo iaito or other iaito-related gear for your late Christmas or New Year’s present!

All in-stock iaito – reduced $200 off the original price. 
To clear out existing inventory, I’ve reduced the price of all in-stock iaito by $200.

Save 20% on all in-stock Sageo! 

The savings price will be reflected in the shopping cart.

In stock items include:

#1 Basic 2-4-0 shaku (72.7cm), 745g, Ivy Kashira, Butterfly menuki, Yatsumokko tsuba, Plastic White samegawa, Cotton ito – Black, Black Ishime saya, Plain brass habaki, Notare hamon

#2 Basic 2-5-9 shaku (78.5cm), 950g, Ivy kashira, Butterfly menuki, Shihosukashi tsuba, Plastic White samegawa, Cotton ito – Black, Black Ishime saya, Plain Brass habaki, Notare hamon

#3 Basic 2-4-5 (74.2cm), 930g, Ivy kashira, Butterfly menuki, Mokko Edohigo tsuba, Plastic White samegawa, Cotton ito – Black, Black Ishime saya, Plain Brass habaki, Notare hamon

#4 Basic 2-5-0 (75.8cm), 920g, Ivy kashira, Butterfly menuki, Yatsumokko tsuba, Plastic White samegawa, Cotton ito- Black, Black Ishime saya, Plain Brass habaki, Notare hamon

#5 Intermediate 2-4-5 (74.2cm), 925g, Bamboo kashira, Bamboo Leaves menuki, Bamboo Leaves tsuba, Real White samegawa, Cotton ito – Dark Blue, Black Ishime saya, Plain Brass habaki, Suguha hamon

#6 Intermediate 2-5-0 (75.8cm), 930g, Kikusui kashira, Ichirin Kiku menuki, Sakura/Kiku Sukashi tsuba, Real White samegawa, Cotton ito – Black, Black Glossy saya, Plain Brass habaki, Gunome hamon

I also have a selection of various color cotton and silk sageo.
Kaku-obi
Vinyl single sword bags, medium and long sized. Double sword bag.
Uchiko powder – 2 grades
Choji oil – 2 grades
Basic Cleaning kits – includes uchiko and choji
Polyester iaido obi – black

Check out our online store at http://iaito.musoshindenryu.com

December Newsletter

Agassiz Dojo News

Greetings!
This fall and year has flown by! I can’t believe it’s already December, though an unusually warm and snow-free one, and we’re 3 weeks away from Christmas.

News
Pangea 2012 a good showing

We had an information table at the Pangea Culture Festival that was held in Moorhead, MN in November where we met several people interested in Japanese sword arts, and gave a demonstration of Seitei, Musoshindenryu, and Tachi Uchi no Kurai kata. We had a pretty good crowd watch us, and people especially seemed interested in the paired bokuto Tachi Uchi portion.
Thank you to Sarah and Tyler for helping me mind the booth, and participate in the demonstration. I appreciate it! We’ll try again next year to attend this interesting cultural event.

2nd Annual Agassiz Dojo / MWKF Iaido Seminar a Success!

Last weekend we had our second regional iaido seminar. We had a smaller group attending this year, which meant more personalized attention and interaction with the two sensei who attended. We welcomed back both Konno and Parker sensei, who came to our first seminar last year, and had participants from MN and CA.
The program consisted of a Friday practice for new arrivals and dojo members where Parker sensei introduced the first 6 Tachi Uchi no Kurai kata. These kata are paired kata using a bokuto (wooden sword) where one person is the “attacker” and the other is the “winner.” It is a great way to learn distance and timing.
Saturday’s schedule broke participants into two groups based on experience, who then worked with each of the sensei on kihon and the seitei series kata. There was lots of personal attention, and I could see marked improvement in everyone! Both Konno and Parker sensei provided us with demonstrations of their koryu kata, Musoshindenryu and Muso Jikiden Eishin ryu respectively.
We had an excellent dinner at Osaka Sushi and Hibachi restaurant in Fargo. The teppanyaki show they do is quite entertaining, and everyone had their fill of good food and drink.
Sunday brought more review of kata and kihon (basic techniques) and then some self practice where the sensei offered feedback.
It was an excellent opportunity for learning and quality feedback at a personal level! It was a great prep for people to review before heading to Summer Camp in Omaha next summer for gradings. I can’t wait until next year!
The photos are available for viewing at the following gallery: https://picasaweb.google.com/108692945864145681948/2012AgassizDojoIaidoSeminar?authuser=0&feat=directlink

Upcoming Events

Enrollment Opening and Embu – Mid January

Currently we’re not accepting any new students, but in the new year we’ll once again open enrollment and will possibly be accepting new students. I’m hoping to have an “open house” Embu of sorts first to have existing members showcase the kata they’re familar with and answer any questions people might have. We’ll send out an announcement once a date has been decided.

Dojo Grading – Late January to Early February

We’ll be having our next dojo grading in the new year after we’ve had a chance to review some of the seitei points. Currently, we’ve been working on koryu kata – both Tachi Uchi no Kurai, and the Shoden set of Musoshindenryu.

Iaido Summer Camp June 27-30, 2013 in Omaha NE

Several (if not all) of our members are planning to attend this event in June for seminar, taikai (tournament) and shinsa (grading). It’s a big event, and a lot of fun to meet practitioners from around the world. Highly recommended, so mark your calendars and start saving now!

Winnepeg CKF Iaido Seminar – Mid October

This event is replacing what was Eric Tribe sensei’s seminar formerly held in Thunder Bay, ON. It’s actually a shorter drive, and easy to get to. Featuring 7dan Kyoshi Ohmi sensei. Put it on your calendars and get a passport if you don’t have one!
We’ll post the seminar pictures and I’ll send another mail once that’s up live.
Have a great Holiday and Merry Christmas!
Brad

October Newsletter

Whew, life just seems to get busier and busier. Looking in the archives, I found I haven’t sent a newsletter since July. As we move through fall, things don’t seem to be slowing down much either.

Upcoming Events

We’ve got a couple of things coming up in the next month or two, and hopefully some of you whom this newletter reaches will be able to attend.
November 10th will have us at the Pangea Culture festival in Moorhead, MN. This event is a showcase of different cultures with lots of good food, displays, and activities for the family. We’ll be in a booth meeting and greeting people and introducing the art of iaido, and also performing a demonstration of kata. Come out on Saturday the 10th from 10am – 4pm to see what it’s all about.
December 1, 2 – Our Agassiz Dojo / MWKF iaido seminar. We’ll be hosting our seminar this year in Fargo, ND at the Agassiz Middle School gymnasium. Details and registration for the seminar can be found at: http://seminar.musoshindenryu.com.
We welcome people who have never even done iaido to come and join the seminar. We had some absolute beginners last year, and it worked out fine! The caliber of instruction from two top AUSKF iaido sensei to come to our own regional seminar is quite exceptional, and a great opportunity for training.

Rank testing

Congratulations to Sarah V. for achieving her 2kyu rank. Sarah had to perform 5 specific seitei iaido kata with a degree of competance, as well as complete a short written and oral exam. The 5 kata and opening and closing reiho have to be performed between 5:30 and 6:00 minutes, or the candidate is disqualified.
We’ll be having our next rank testing in Mid-Late December, and have started back on our Koryu training in our regular practice sessions again.

Koryu

Love it! We’re going to run through the Musoshindenryu shoden series to review the kata we practiced previously, and also start back on learning the paired Tachi-uchi-no-kurai (kenjutsu-style) bokuto kata. We might even try introducing the second, Chuden set of kata if time allows. Can’t wait to get going on these again!

Dojo Space

The building owner was put under some pressure from the city to be compliant for restrooms and parking being available for the building we have the dojo in. Good for us, as the toilets should be installed within the month, and we’ll have a bunch of new, paved parking spots available for us soon!
In the interim, let’s be careful to not track in mud, dirt from the area in front of the door into the dojo by removing and keeping our shoes near the door.

One Point Japanese

Greetings and Salutations! Greetings in the Japanese language can be both formal and casual, depending on who you’re saying them to. They’re also “time specific” and used on first greeting of someone in the day.
Ohayogozaimasu! (Ohio-go-zai-masu) Good morning! This is a greeting used for to greet anybody during the morning hours. Typically it is used up to 11:00 AM or so. For a more formal situation, it is often accompanied with a slight bow of the head and/or upper body – for example greeting one’s boss the first time you meet them that morning at work. I’d often see receptionist / office staff standing and bowing like this when all of the managers and senior staff were arriving in the morning.
Konnichiwa. (Koh-NEE-chee-wah) Good afternoon. This greeting is used from around 11:00 AM to around 5:00 PM, and is part of a larger phrase, “Konnichi wa, ikaga desuka,” which essentially means “How are you today?”
Konbanwa. (Kohn-bahn-wah) Good evening. Used after or around 7 PM, but not usually before that.
So you can see, there is a small “gap” in times where we’re not using konnichiwa or konbanwa. The time of evening between 5 and 7 PM is called, “yugata,” or early evening, but we don’t have a specific greeting for this time of day. It’s strange, and you’ll just have to decide what to say when that occurs!
Jya Ne! / Mata ne! See you (later)! This is a very informal way of saying goodbye to someone who is of equal “status” as you, friends, and family.
Jya, Mata! Same, but slightly more formal than above.
Mata XXXX. Until next XXXX.
This could be Mata ne: Later!
Mata ashita: Until tomorrow.
Mata rai-shu: Until next week.
Mata kondo: Until next time.
Do you see the patterns here? Hopefully you can now have some idea of how to greet and say goodbye to you dojo mates and friends.
Until next time – Mata kondo!
Brad

Leave it at the Door

At the start of our practice after we’ve bowed to shommen and are sitting in seiza, the first thing we do is mokuso. This is a practice that I did in kendo, and thought it was appropriate to carry it through into iaido. We also finish our practice with it in much the same manner.
According to Wikipedia, Mokuso (黙想 mokusō) is a Japanese term for meditation, especially when practiced in the traditional Japanese martial arts. Mokuso (pronounced “moh-kso”) is performed before beginning a training session in order to “clear one’s mind”, very similar to the zen concept of mushin. This term is more formally known to mean, “Warming up the mind for training hard.”
How I describe it to my students is basically, “Leaving what’s outside the dojo, outside the dojo, and preparing ourselves and our minds for what we’re about to do inside the dojo.” In addition, I personally use it to replay in my head what areas of my own upcoming practice I’d like to specifically keep in the back of my mind. Things like, don’t drop the kissaki, take the power out of my arms and put it into my hara, move like a mountain moves, and so on.
I really do think that it helps me focus and begin the practice with the right frame of mind. So much so that if I get off track for some reason or distracted while I’m practicing, I may just sit down and perform mokuso again – especially when I’m practicing solo and get distracted by the phone or visitors.
Mushin, or “no mindedness / without mind” is a concept that applies to all martial arts, but is particularly noted in the sword arts. Essentially, it is a mental state in which the practitioner’s mind is not fixed on or cluttered with thought; but rather open, and without emotion – free to act or react  to their opponent.
Perhaps through countless hours (years?) of practice, our bodies and muscles will eventually “memorize” the movements, freeing our mind from the conscious thoughts of correct movement, posture, etc., and we will finally be able to attain this state of Mushin.
At the end of practice we again perform mokuso, and during this time, I reflect on the things I did well, new “learnings,” and things to work on during the next practice. It’s a mental review of sorts.
Kendo practitioners perform mokuso while breathing in through the nose, and out through the mouth. Perhaps this is to prepare for the breathing used during keiko, or perhaps it’s just a way to relax the body and help attain this state of meditation.
Apart from just being a part of the reishiki of kendo and iaido, I really do believe that performing this ritual helps put us in the right frame of mind to learn, and is a small, yet essential part of the art.

Seminar Reschedule

Some may have already heard, but our planned MWKF/Agassiz Dojo 2nd iaido seminar scheduled for end of July has been postponed until sometime later this fall.
During the spring / summer, there are a bunch of different iaido events that people can attend, and I think that because of the timing, we just weren’t going to have a very good turnout.
Instead, I’m hoping we can plan something for the weekend of November16-18 pending availability of the AUSKF sensei. If people are interested in attending at that time, I’d love to hear a quick reply back so I can have some idea of possible attendees.
Brad